News

How Our Local Legislators Fared on Police and Criminal Justice Reform Issues

It was a banner year on police and criminal justice reform issues before the state legislature.  The ACLU of California just issued a legislative scorecard on issues they endorsed and showed how all of the legislators voted on them.  For our purposes we’re pulling out only the police and criminal justice reform measures to evaluate how Senator Bill Dodd and Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry fared.

Brown signs trio of bills authored by Aguiar-Curry

WINTERS — Gov. Jerry Brown has signed three bills penned by Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, D-Winters, aimed at wildfire recovery.

The bills, Assembly Bill 1772, Assembly Bill 2380 and Assembly Bill 2518, focus on different areas designed to help residents, first responders and develop innovative uses for forestry products, according to a press release.

Read more here.

 

Working parents in California need help with child care

By Cecilia Aguiar-Curry
Special to The Sacramento Bee

For many working families, access to quality child care has become an unattainable privilege, leaving parents with a difficult decision: Do they work to support their family, or stay at home to care for their kids? This dilemma is being faced by more and more California parents, struggling to cobble together whatever child care they can find. This is unacceptable, which is why I authored Assembly Bill 2292 and will be holding a rally with child care advocates and parents on Tuesday.

This bill would expand our state’s child care capacity by increasing the rates paid to providers for infant and toddler care, offering grants to help pay for new and renovated day care facilities, and establishing a fund to recruit and train a new generation of providers.

Unanimous support in committee for child care bill

A recent California Assembly bill, AB 2292, championed by Yolo County Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, proposes improvements to the child care system. By establishing the Early Education Expansion Program, the bill’s goal is to provide better access to high-quality child care and education programs for infants as well as toddlers. AB 2292 proposes to establish grant programs to fund both child care facilities and the recruitment of skilled child care workers. The bipartisan bill made it through the education committee’s hearing with unanimous support. It is now on its way to the appropriations committee.

“There is a child care crisis going on in the whole nation,” said Sandy Batchelor, the work-life coordinator at UC Davis, who works alongside student parents.

Bill to expand child care sails out of committee

AB 2292, authored by Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, D-Winters, passed out of the Assembly Education Committee this week on a bipartisan  7-0 vote. This bill, which would increase the reimbursement rates for infant and toddler care is a California Legislative Women’s Caucus priority for the year, and the only state budget request the caucus is backing.

The legislation also would create a grant program to help pay for new and renovated child-care facilities, and establishing a fund to recruit a new generation of providers.

Advocates to Honor State Legislators for Prioritizing Young Kids

SACRAMENTO – The statewide network of First 5s will gather May 2 at the steps of the State Capitol to honor three legislators with Champion for Children Awards as part of First 5’s 20thAnniversary celebration marking California voters’ approval of Prop 10.  Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood) will deliver the keynote for the award ceremony.

Assemblymembers Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters), Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), and Kevin McCarty (D-Sacramento) are backing efforts this legislative session to increase pay and recruitment of child care providers (Aguiar-Curry, AB 2292); bolster home visiting for CalWORKs families with small children (Arambula, AB 992); and advance more rigorous developmental screening practices (McCarty, AB 11). Senator Mike McGuire (D-Healdsburg) will receive an award earlier in the day as a former commissioner of First 5 Sonoma County.

We need a backup plan for Trump's nuclear button

For too many Americans, the past year has awoken fears that had faded over the past 30 years. President Donald Trump has threatened to rain "fire and fury" down upon North Korea. He has announced a program to build new and more "usable" nuclear weapons. A recent false alarm in Hawaii of an incoming missile attack sent thousands of families running for cover. Anxieties have risen to the point that a majority of Americans do not trust the president to handle a nuclear crisis.

This is not acceptable.

Aguiar-Curry nets $15 million for lake project

SACRAMENTO >> Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters) secured $15 million to aid in the Middle Creek Restoration project, part of an effort to promote the natural habitats and health of Clear Lake.

Aguiar-Curry made the announcement on Monday after successfully working with Secretary John Laird of the California Natural Resources Agency (CNRA) and the Department of Water Resources (DWR). The funds will help complete the first phase of the project, located at the north end of Clear Lake. The grant will be funded by bond proceeds from Propositions 84 and 1E.

California wanted to bridge the digital divide but left rural areas behind. Now that's about to change.

Until a few years ago, most students in Winters — a farming community of 7,000 west of Sacramento — did not have computers at home. So the city’s then-mayor, Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, pushed for a program that enabled the school district’s sixth-graders to check out laptops along with their textbooks.

Their parents were required to learn how to use the computers as well. For some, it was their first time surfing the web or sending an email.

New California law expands low-income parents’ access to subsidized child care

In an effort to remove obstacles for Californians trying to succeed in the labor market, a new law could make access to child care easier for low-income parents taking classes to learn English or complete high school.

The law will expand the eligibility requirements for subsidized child care. It will make low-income parents who are are enrolled in English as a second language classes (ESL) or a program to earn a high school diploma or general education development certificate (GED) eligible to place their children in subsidized care.