News

Monday, October 16, 2017

There's a new law on the books in California that will remove a barrier for low-income parents aiming to access education. Under a bill signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown last week, poor parents enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) or high school equivalency courses will be eligible for subsidized child care. 

Monday, October 9, 2017

Sacramento, California – Earlier today, Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation that would require California officials to focus on and address the challenges facing farmers of color in the state by making access to  state and federal resources more equitable. This comes at a critical moment as the current generation of farmers is retiring and new farmers are increasingly represented by people of color, including immigrants and refugees.

“While historic discrimination won’t be solved overnight, the Farmer Equity Act opens the door requiring that  state officials identify and address the ways farmers of color, including black farmers, have largely been ignored,” said Dr. Gail Myers, PhD, co-founder of Oakland-based Farms to Grow, and a leading member of the California Farmer Justice Collaborative.

The Farmer Equity Act, AB 1348, authored by Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters), directs the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to better provide resources, outreach, technical assistance, and decision-making power to “socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers,” so called because they have been subjected to historic racial discrimination.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry’s AB 317, providing Napa County with permanent, annual funding to support the three farmworker housing centers totaling 180 beds.

Beginning in the next budget cycle, the Napa County Housing Authority will receive $250,000 in matching dollars each year. The bill had been promoted as private-public model for farmworker housing developed by Napa County.

Friday, April 28, 2017

The Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument in Northern California is among 24 national monuments that are at risk of losing their federally protected status.

President Trump issued an executive order Wednesday asking for an unprecedented review of the two dozen monuments that make up 100,000 acres of more, and were created by presidential proclamation since 1996.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

A new bill unanimously approved by the Assembly Agricultural Committee Wednesday could significantly alter the way the California Department of Food and Agriculture works with farmers of color. 

The Farmer Equity Act would support minority farmers by adding them to the definition for “Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers” in existing California Food and Agriculture code.  Kristyn Leach is a Korean grower who runs a small vegetable farm in Alameda County. She says the bill gives farmers of color that have been subject to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice a larger say in California agriculture.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

A bill unanimously approved by the Assembly Agricultural Committee Wednesday could significantly alter the way the California Department of Food and Agriculture works with farmers of color.

The Farmer Equity Act would support minority farmers by adding them to the definition for “Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers” in existing California Food and Agriculture code.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

CA Climate and Agriculture Network

Every legislative session, CalCAN reviews dozens of bills proposed by California legislators for their potential impact on farmers, their communities, and the climate. Below is an initial list of bills we have taken a position on (we are still tracking and analyzing more!)...

Assembly Bill 1348 (Aguiar-Curry): Farmer Equity Act
SUPPORT

This bill takes an important step toward ensuring equitable access to California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) programs by farmers of color by requiring that CDFA begin reporting outreach efforts and program usage data for “socially disadvantaged farmers,” which include farmers and ranchers who identify as African American, American Indian, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander…